Marriage Matters: Self-Worth vs. God-Worth

People wrestle with knowing, feeling, and accepting who they are. This goes back to the “fall of man” in Genesis.

The world’s definition of self-worth is based on performance and what you think about it. This basic concept leads to four FALSE BELIEFS:

  1. I must meet certain standards in order to feel OK about myself. (Fear of Failure)
  2. I must have the approval of others in order to feel OK about myself. (Fear of Rejection)
  3. Those who fail are unworthy of love and deserve punishment. (Fear of Condemnation)
  4. I am what I am; I cannot change; I am hopeless. (Fear of Hopelessness)

God’s definition of self-worth is based on what God’s truth says, not performance or what others say. It is who we are in the context of our relationship with Christ.

“…the truth will set you free.” John 8:32

God’s solution to the fear of failure is the doctrine of justification. Because of Christ’s redemptive work on the cross, we are complete in Him and fully pleasing.

God’s solution to the fear of rejection is the doctrine of reconciliation. Because of Christ’s redemptive work on the cross, He has reconciled us back to the Father. He has bridged the gap and we are, therefore, approved by God.

God’s solution to the fear of condemnation is the doctrine of propitiation. At the cross, Jesus took all Satan’s accusations and decrees against us and nailed them to the cross. Because of Christ’s redemptive work on the cross, we are deeply loved and completely forgiven.

God’s solution to the fear of hopelessness is the doctrine of regeneration. Because of Christ’s redemptive work on the cross, we have been made brand new and complete in Him. With Christ, we are able to make the changes necessary to live a life of faith and joy.

This Easter season ask God to help you write a new life story, while allowing Him to be the Author and Perfecter of your faith.

Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God. Hebrews 12:2

Staying the course

Think Back…You can never remember a time like this, can you? Turbulent, unsettled times…terrorism…political upheaval…the shredding of the moral fabric of our society…countless shifts in policies and programs and cultural fads. It can get scary.

So what is our posture? To lament, “God, take me home and get me out of this mess!” No, our deportment should rather be to stay the course, to fulfill our God-given mission: to help more people become fully committed followers of Jesus.

Why? Because this is the unwavering message brought to us in the pages of Scripture again and again:

Noah was called on to do something that seemed foolish—if not impossible—and he was mocked for it. Yet he stayed the course—and saved the human race.

Moses spent 40 years in the desert, caring for sheep, and 40 more years leading rebellious Israelites. Yet God gave him strength to stay the course—and he delivered the Israelites from 400 years of slavery.

Joseph was wrongly accused, nearly killed, imprisoned, but he stayed the course—and saved Israel from the devastating famine.

David was pursued within inches of losing his life, more than once. The king, whom he served, tried to kill him. Yet he stayed the course—and became the greatest king of Israel’s history.

Look at Jesus’ own life. He felt pressure. He groaned. He was troubled by the world. Yet he could say, in John 14:1, “Let not your heart be troubled.”

Stay the course. God speaks that same message to this generation.

We do not need to live in fear, no matter what the latest news cable might say. God knows what is happening and He knows what He is doing. And you are here for His purposes, not your own. So, stay the course.